4 Views· 07/09/24· Film & Animation

No African is FREE From Our Historical Trauma.


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#historicaltrauma#intergenerationaltrauma#HealingJourney
#communityresilience#traumarecovery#UnresolvedTrauma
#healingfromthepast#resilientcommunities#socialjusticenow#recoveryispossible no matter who you are if you are an African, MDH Muntu member of the Bantu race-you carry a tragic historical trauma in and around your mentality and life. In all probability affecting you adversely.
Basic Practical Steps to minimise this terror have eluded the majority as they adopt the coloniser enslaver methods to heal this perennial disgusting subtle Historical chronic Trauma? What about the islamic enslavement which is longer did Jehovah forgot about it? What proof is there that an African, MDH, Muntu member of the Bantu race has No FREEDOM From African Historical Trauma? What Steps should Every Black person take to mitigate and reduce its adversely IMPACT? Healing from historical traumas and reclaiming agency through African spirituality involves a multifaceted process that integrates individual and collective healing, cultural revitalization, and social transformation. Here are logical steps to facilitate this journey: Acknowledgment and Understanding: The first step is acknowledging the impact of historical traumas, such as colonization, enslavement, and systemic oppression, on African communities. This involves understanding how these traumas have affected individuals, families, and societies across generations. Reconnecting with Ancestral Wisdom: African spirituality emphasizes the interconnectedness of past, present, and future. Reconnecting with ancestral wisdom through rituals, ceremonies, and storytelling can provide a sense of continuity and guidance in navigating healing processes.
Healing Practices: African spirituality offers a rich tapestry of healing practices, including herbal medicine, energy work, dance, music, and storytelling. These practices address the holistic well-being of individuals, addressing physical, emotional, mental, and spiritual dimensions.
Community Support and Solidarity: Healing from historical traumas often requires the support of a caring and empathetic community. African spirituality fosters a sense of communal solidarity, where individuals come together to share experiences, offer support, and uplift one another.
Rituals of Remembrance and Reclamation: Engaging in rituals of remembrance and reclamation can help honor ancestors, acknowledge past injustices, and reclaim cultural identity. This might include ceremonies to honor ancestors, commemorate historical events, or reclaim sacred spaces. Cultural Revitalization: African spirituality is deeply intertwined with cultural practices, traditions, and expressions. Revitalizing cultural practices, such as language, art, music, and dance, helps strengthen cultural identity and resilience in the face of historical traumas.
Empowerment and Agency: African spirituality emphasizes the agency and empowerment of individuals within the context of their communities. By reclaiming spiritual practices and cultural traditions, individuals can assert their autonomy and reclaim agency over their lives and narratives.
Addressing Intergenerational Trauma: African spirituality recognizes the intergenerational transmission of trauma and the importance of healing across generations. Healing rituals and ceremonies can be designed to address intergenerational wounds and promote healing for future generations.
Reconnecting people to the vibrant strengths of their Totems-ancestry and culture, helping people process the grief of past traumas, and creating new historical narratives can have healing effects for those experiencing historical trauma.
Trauma is a psychological, emotional response to a brutal, spiritual and physical painful and mental jumbling event or series of events that overwhelms an individual's or social group’s ability to cope.
Maafa- Word that describes THE WORLDS MOST HEINOUS CRIME perpetrated by Europeans and pale arabs, a race that never attacked Them but loved them and caused them no pain! The Swahili word for “great disaster” or “great tragedy,” is a term used to refer to the centuries-long enslavement and murder of millions of Africans.
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LINK For The Free From God
Free from God.: Unveiling Spirituality That Breeds Wisdom eBook : LMDumizulu, PTR: Amazon.com.au: Kindle Store

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